Loss of Interest May Be a Sign of Dementia

According to a study that was published in the online issue of Neurology on October 14, older adults who show no interest in normal activities or have severe apathy have a larger chance of developing dementia as compared to people with fewer apathy symptoms.

Meredith Bock, from the University of California and the author of the study says that apathy is distressing to family members, especially when people do not want to meet up with friends or family or they are no longer interested in what they used to like. She adds that while more research needs to be carried out, it’s possible that these may be early signs of people who are at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. She says that these individuals could potentially benefit from early efforts and interventions to reduce other risk factors associated with these diseases.

The study had 2,018 adult participants with the average age being 74. None of the adults in the study had dementia. At the beginning of the study, the researchers used a survey with various questions to measure the apathy levels of the individuals. The questions focused on a 4-week duration and asked the participants if they’d been interested in participating in various activities or leaving their homes to go out. They then divided the participants into three groups i.e. those with severe, low and moderate apathy. Almost a decade later, the researchers then determined which participants had dementia by looking at their hospital records, results on cognitive tests and medication use.

By the study’s end, almost 19% of the participants, which represents 381 people, had dementia. Among the 768 individuals who were grouped in low apathy, 14% of them; 111 people, developed dementia. This, when compared to the 143 individuals who developed dementia from the moderate group seems slightly lower. The moderate group was made up of 742 individuals, 19% of whom developed dementia. 127 participants from the severe apathy group, making up 25% of the 508 people in the group developed dementia.

The researchers then adjusted for education, age, cardiovascular risk factors and other additional factors that may affect dementia risk and discovered that individuals with severe apathy were 80% more likely to develop dementia as compared to those with low apathy. It should be noted that at the beginning of the study, greater apathy was associated with worse cognitive scores.

The only limitation of the study was that they used an algorithm to diagnose dementia. This may not be as in-depth as an evaluation done by a doctor.

Such studies enrich the biomedical sphere with new possibilities to explore. Speaking of new possibilities, KBL Merger Corp. (NASDAQ: KBLM) (KBL Merger Corp. Rights NASDAQ: KBLMR) (KBL Merger Corp. Warrant NASDAQ: KBLMW), a Special Purpose Acquisition Corporation (“SPAC”), previously announced the acquisition of 180 Life Sciences Corp., an interesting company you should watch. It focuses on the clinical-stage biotechnology development of novel drugs aimed at treating inflammatory diseases.

About BioMedWire

BioMedWire (BMW) is a bio-med news and content distribution company that provides (1) access to a network of wire services via InvestorWire to reach all target markets, industries and demographics in the most effective manner possible, (2) article and editorial syndication to 5,000+ news outlets (3), enhanced press release services to ensure maximum impact, (4) social media distribution via the Investor Brand Network (IBN) to nearly 2 million followers, (5) a full array of corporate communications solutions, and (6) a total news coverage solution with BMW Prime. As a multifaceted organization with an extensive team of contributing journalists and writers, BMW is uniquely positioned to best serve private and public companies that desire to reach a wide audience of investors, consumers, journalists and the general public. By cutting through the overload of information in today’s market, BMW brings its clients unparalleled visibility, recognition and brand awareness. BMW is where news, content and information converge.

To receive SMS text alerts from BioMedWire, text “STOCKS” to 77948 (U.S. Mobile Phones Only)

For more information, please visit https://www.BioMedWire.com

Please see full terms of use and disclaimers on the BioMedWire website applicable to all content provided by BMW, wherever published or re-published: http://BMW.fm/Disclaimer

BioMedWire (BMW)
San Francisco, California
www.BioMedWire.com
415.949.5050 Office
Editor@BioMedWire.com

BioMedWire is part of the InvestorBrandNetwork.

Archives

Select A Month

BioMedWire Currently Accepts

Bitcoin

Bitcoin

Bitcoin Cash

Bitcoin Cash

Ethereum

Ethereum

Litecoin

Litecoin

USD Coin

USD Coin

Contact us: 415.949.5050